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True, Amazon doesn’t really need an excuse to have a sale on its Kindles; they’re essentially designed to make you buy as much media as possible from Amazon. But today’s sale is both pretty good and really, really funny.

We Didn’t Start The Fire

Specifically, Amazon is thanking the FAA for reversing a rule that creates one of the greatest annoyances of flying; having to turn your phone, laptop, or, yes, your ebook reader off completely during take-off and landing. The rule has its roots in, essentially, pseudoscientific stupidity; while many people think that assuming cellular signals would interfere with complicated, shielded avionics, the truth is that the rule was implemented in the absence of any evidence.

Not that said rule has stopped severe overreaction by law enforcement for the crime of not turning off your phone during take-off and landing. So there’s reason to celebrate.

Cheap Reads

It’s worth noting the rule will only be lifted as each airline proves it can fly without trouble, but either way, the deals on Kindles are pretty amazing: A Kindle HDX is just $200, a Fire HD is just $118, and if you want to go with the absolute cheapest option, a basic Kindle is just $59. The HDX is probably the best deal, both in terms of what you get in the case and in overall design, but if you just want to keep your books on something relatively cheap, the basic Kindle will do you pretty well. Remember you’ll need to plug in the promo code ThnksFAA before checking out.

Come Fly The Reader-Friendly Skies

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OK, we admit it; the sale itself is more goofy than anything else. And if you want a full-featured tablet, not just a media-streaming device, you're best served picking up, say, the Nexus 7. But if you just want to have books at your fingertips, and you want to save some cash, this will fit the bill nicely.



Dan Seitz

 
Dan Seitz is an obsessive nerd living in New England. He lives in the Boston area with a fiancee, a dog, a cat, and far too many objects with processors.