slider-panel1-sync-BG1

Cloud storage is all the rage these days; Dropbox has 175 million users, Microsoft’s SkyDrive has more users than Twitter, and people are storing everything from music to their documents on the cloud. But not everyone wants to store things on another corporation’s servers, which is where the Transporter Sync comes in.

Sync It Up

The Sync is a small device that essentially creates your own private cloud network; you can even link the Sync to its big brother the Transporter as nodes on a network. All you do is plug the sync into your router, and then plug an external hard drive into the Sync; once it’s on your network, Windows and Macs should find it automatically. Linux users, well, you probably use Ubuntu’s cloud services anyway.

Storage Container

The key thing about the Sync, which makes it more appealing than the Transporter, is really the fact that it’s got more memory capacity. You can hook up a 4TB drive to the Sync and it’ll process it with no problem. The other upside is that the Sync doesn’t have any subscription fees, unlike some cloud storage solutions; once you pay the $100 fee, that’s it. You can enjoy your files in peace without having to worry about them suddenly being locked down until you fork over a credit card.

Transported

71n-5-Q+m3L._SL1500_

That said, it may not be for everyone. If you want to loop in your co-workers on documents, you may not be comfortable handing out a password that also has your downloaded movies and other stuff on there, and you may also have some other problems with privacy as the Sync, like anything else, is only as safe as its password. But if you like your privacy, but need cloud storage, the Sync seems to be an admirably simple solution to a sometimes aggravating problem.










Dan Seitz

 
Dan Seitz is an obsessive nerd living in New England. He lives in the Boston area with a fiancee, a dog, a cat, and far too many objects with processors.