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In the long history of prepared foods, there have been many… unique ideas. Toaster eggs, MREs sold to the common man, astronaut ice cream. But none, perhaps, will top the union of Campbell’s and Keurig to make, well, soup out of a Keurig machine.

The Bold Idea

Needless to say, the soup doesn’t exactly just drop out of your Keurig fully prepared. Actually, if you’ve ever made a batch of ramen, the procedure will sound fairly familiar. You pour packets of dehydrated pasta and vegetables into your mug, slot in the K-cup, and the Keurig pours out hot, delicious broth that rehydrates your soup components and gives you soup without having to open a can.

Of course, this does raise the question of why you wouldn’t just bring a can of soup to work, but let’s roll with it for now.

But Why Would Campbell’s Do This?

The short answer is that young people do not drink soup. Campbell’s has been trying to figure out how to get the young folks to drink their products for a while now; you may have noticed that there are new types of packaging to make chugging soup more convenient, and new flavors that are a bit more adventurous than what you’d expect from a company like Campbell’s. Apparently they figure years of eating noodles out of a foam cup in college means they’ll try anything that vaguely resembles the food.

Will It Succeed?

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That’s the million dollar question. It’s worth noting that Campbell’s is defining this as a “snack”, not a meal, so this isn’t designed to replace your lunch. In fact, they haven’t even worked out a calorie count for these little soup bombs just yet. But, on the other hand, anything that makes preparing food more convenient should probably be embraced, especially if you’re in the workplace and you need to eat something fast. Still, we’ll have to see how these work out; they’re arriving later this year or early next.



Dan Seitz

 
Dan Seitz is an obsessive nerd living in New England. He lives in the Boston area with a fiancee, a dog, a cat, and far too many objects with processors.