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A lot of people are excited for Google Glass. I am not among their number; I think it’s going to revolutionize industry and public service, but as a consumer product, meh. It’s the Betamax of personal gadgets. And I don’t really like baseball either, but I’ve got to admit, Blue goes a long way towards justifying Google Glass for both.

Statistics In Real Time

Why? Because it’s a baseball nerd’s dream.

Hardcore baseball fans love numbers, lots of numbers, and Blue is designed to give them numbers. As anybody who has been to a baseball game knows, the scoreboard isn’t exactly the most granular of statistical tickers.

This is where Blue comes in; it geolocates you to find the ballpark, and then determines what game is being played there. And that’s when the fun begins.

Granular Like Sugar, Baby

Maybe I should rethink that headline. Nah.

Anyway, Blue basically puts everything you need to know in your eye while you’re watching the game. For example, you’ll know who’s pitching, what pitch they threw, and how fast they threw it. If the ump makes a call you think is insane, Blue will find an explanation for why that happened. It’s basically the information of a TV broadcast, except at a ballpark.

Don’t Miss Anything

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And, of course, the app being connected to the Internet and all, you’ll be able to get up and grab a beer without worrying about missing anything. It’s pretty much the ideal method of watching the game.

One of the problems many have raised about Google Glass is the idea that you’re not actually engaged with the world around you, and in many cases, like, oh, say, driving, that’s a serious concern. But for a baseball game, where for many people part of the fun is running the numbers, Glass can actually add to the experience, at least if Blue is any indication.



Dan Seitz

 
Dan Seitz is an obsessive nerd living in New England. He lives in the Boston area with a fiancee, a dog, a cat, and far too many objects with processors.