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Nobody likes a wine snob, but everybody likes a decent wine. The problem is that decent wine is generally more expensive, so most of us wind up drinking grape-flavored jet fuel. The Savino is designed to help you improve the flavor of your wines, by putting just the right amount of oxygen into the mix.

You might want to strap yourself in: To explain how the Savino works, we have to venture into the dread realm of chemistry. First of all, anybody who is talking about the “jammy” notes of a red is completely full of crap: Respected academic/professional wine snob troll Frédéric Brochet has proven this. Repeatedly. But it is pretty easy to tell the difference between a “young” wine and a properly aged one.

How? Tannins. Part of the reason that jug of red you got for five bucks leaves your mouth feeling like a desert is that the tannins from the skins, stems and seeds of the red grapes are yanking the proteins right out of your saliva. The good news is that tannins break down in oxygen. The problem is, well, expose anything chemically reactive to oxygen for too long and it starts getting nasty, and wine is no exception.

So the Savino works by allowing just the right amount of oxygen. First, decant your wine into the carafe, and then, pop on the seal. The exposure breaks down the tannins a bit, mellowing the flavor. Next, pop on the floating seal: It’ll keep the oxygen away, but is easily broken by tilting the carafe and pouring yourself a delicious glass of wine. That way, you get the oxygen in there, but not constant exposure to oxygen which turns it into vinegar.

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This will also preserve good bottles of wine, of course, but let’s face it; we’ll likely be using this for Three-Buck Chuck anyway.



Dan Seitz

 
Dan Seitz is an obsessive nerd living in New England. He lives in the Boston area with a fiancee, a dog, a cat, and far too many objects with processors.