Logitech is one of few companies that consistently builds high-quality products. At Gadget Review we see hundreds if not thousands of electronics, peripherals, and devices through our offices. To say the vast majority aren’t worth purchasing is an understatement, which is why there is a very short list of companies that rarely fail to impress. As I’ve stated several times in the past, Logitech is one of the top sellers.

When it comes to gaming peripherals, there are only a few standout companies, and most specialize in that field. Razer, SteelSeries, and a few boutique manufacturers dominate the field of gaming, where allegiences run high and the argument of design vs form, feel vs technology, and features vs gaming-worth are rampant. While everyone has their favorite devices, two of my three favorite peripherals are the G930 headset and G700 wireless gaming mouse.

The G100s, an update to the G100 which never made it to the US, is a base gaming mouse that puts the G300 to shame with an enhanced yet still ambidextrous design that is rounded instead of highly angular. While the G300 was the previous base model stateside, selling for $40 just like the G100s will when it launches later this month, the G100s includes fewer buttons, fewer features, but a far better design and significantly better tracking.

As a power mouse user (the G700 is my home desktop mouse; I switch between the Logitech Performance Mouse MX and Anywhere Mouse MX for work), I require the additional buttons and features of a more expensive mouse, especially for gaming. Yet my biggest frustration from the G100s was in fact web browsing, specifically having to press the back button. The enhanced Optical sensor performed flawlessly in my two weeks of testing across several different surface types. It feels more accurate than the G700 too, even at a relatively meager 2500DPi maximum (most high-end gaming mice go over 7000DPi these days). The mouse feet glide very well, thanks in part to the lightness of the mouse and the improved surfaces.

The G100s has only four buttons: left, right, and middle click, and a DPI adjuster. It’s as bare-bones as a mouse should be, though to reiterate the actual performance is rarely hindered by this. For gamers who only use the main mouse buttons when playing, the G100s is surprisingly excellent considering the price. The hydrophobic coating keeps the G100s dry even for sweaty hands, and it’s perfectly suited for right or left-handed gamers without feeling out of place for either type.

The design is actually perfectly suited for claw-grip gamers, though it may feel small for full-palm players. The general shape is extremely well balanced; in the past I wouldn’t even consider a $40 gaming mouse as a suitable entry for gamers. In fact, going into this review I expected to write that the G100s is another low-end mouse to pass on because the higher-end options are better. But after minor (ongoing) testing of the G400s and G500s, the G100s is in fact on par with the more heavily featured, more expensive mice. What it lacks in features it and functions like additional buttons, macro, and on-board memory the G100s makes up in excellent build quality and performance.

Logitech has once again broken new ground, this time by making one of the first excellent low-cost gaming mice. It matches the performance of some of its top competitors and the higher-echelon mice in Logitech’s own G-line. With a minimalist design and a $40 price tag, the G100s Optical Gaming Mouse is the best low-cost gaming mouse there is. So if you’re looking for an inexpensive, but not cheap, gift for a friend, neighbor, or even a stranger, they won’t be disappointed with the G100s. And if they are when they see it, tell them to give it a try. They’ll change their mind. I certainly did.

Editor’s Rating:

Rating: ★★★★½

Excellent

Bottom Line: A surprisingly high-quality low-cost gaming mouse

Pros:

  • Excellent tracking and movement
  • Superb ambidextrous design that is very comfortable
  • Hydrophobic coating keeps it dry, even under sweaty palms
  • Simply the best mouse at this price point. By a longshot.

Cons:

  • 2500 DPi may be low for some users
  • Double the price and you can get all of the same excellence on a much more functional mouse










James Pikover

 
Spawned in the horrendous heat of a Los Angeles winter, James was born with an incessant need to press buttons. Whether it was the car radio, doorbells on Halloween or lights, James pushed, pressed and prodded every button. No elevator was left unscathed, no building intercom was left un-rung, and no person he’s known has been left un-annoyed.