Oxford University is testing out a self-driving Nissan Leaf that has all its in-car technology controlled from an Apple iPad on the dashboard. It’s guided by a cost friendly navi system that actually gauges its surroundings via small cameras and lasers that are built into the body of the car in such a way that it’s barely noticeable. It doesn’t rely on GPS, with the iPad offering the driver the option of taking over a portion of the route. A touch on the screen can switch the car back to self-driving mode where a robotic system takes over. Right now, it’s being tested at Begbroke Science Park, near Oxford, with the next stage enabling the new robotic system to understand complex traffic flows and to make decisions on the best routes to take, said Dr. Ingmar Posner, who is co-leading the project. The prototype navi system is estimated to cost about $7,625 right now, with the long-term goal being able to produce a system that costs only $151.



Kristie Bertucci

 
Kristie Bertucci is an L.A.-based writer, who can't live without her MacBook Pro. When she's not writing, she's either reading or shopping (online, of course) and loves lazy days so she can catch up on her DVR-recorded shows and movies. She's definitely a Mac girl, she loves music and is currently on a mission to to have an insane and enviable iTunes library.