Volkswagen showed off its new 2013 E-Up! at the 2011 Frankfurt Motor Show. It’s a city car that sports that will first be made in gasoline form, but will soon include an electric drivetrain by 2012. VW is calling it a “giant among small cars,” as it measures 39.4 inches long and 64.6 inches wide, making it a bit narrower than a Mini Cooper hardtop. Although it’s tiny, the interior will comfortably fit four passengers and still have room for cargo space (you get even more if you fold the rear seats up!).

Under the hood is an electric motor that supplies the propulsive power for the concept car. Propelling it to a top speed of 184 mph, the electric engine produces a continuous output of 54 hp with a peak of 80 hp. The nearly silent electric motors also develops a maximum torque of 155 lb.-ft. of torque. Drivers can activate the forward or reverse gear by a pushbutton that’s stored on the center console of the vehicle’s interior.

As for the battery capacity, it’s said to be 18 kilowatt-hours (kWh), which allows for about 80 miles of driving between charging (all depending on how you drive though). The batteries are located in the underbody of the vehicle, while all other key driving components are located in the front engine compartment.

As for its styling cues, the E-Up! features a very distinctive design at its front end, which is its arc-shaped layout of the LED daytime running lights in the bumper. It also has an upper engine cooling air slot that’s between the headlights and the VW logo, which is covered by a chrome trim strip due to narrow air intake slots above and below the license plate serve to cool the drive system of the car.










Kristie Bertucci

 
Kristie Bertucci is an L.A.-based writer, who can't live without her MacBook Pro. When she's not writing, she's either reading or shopping (online, of course) and loves lazy days so she can catch up on her DVR-recorded shows and movies. She's definitely a Mac girl, she loves music and is currently on a mission to to have an insane and enviable iTunes library.